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Late effects of cancer and treatment

For many, surviving their cancer diagnosis is just the first step. The good news is that so many cancer patients do survive long term. The bad news is that they are living long enough to develop a potential late effect. A late effect is any one of a large variety of toxicities that can affect virtually any organ system.

In other words, life after cancer treatment of any type can include risks for conditions and diseases that result directly from that treatment. These conditions can surface months, and even years, later. Thus, knowing the risks of treatment and learning what to watch for are crucial steps for survivors to be able to effectively anticipate and manage potential health issues.

"The Childhood Cancer Survivor"

"Living with Survival: the Childhood Cancer Survivor" is presented by Nancy L. Dunn, M.D., F.A.A.P., an associate professor of pediatrics at VCU. Dr. Dunn specializes in pediatric hematology/oncology and directs the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Survivorship Clinic at VCU Children’s Medical Center.

"Long-Term Considerations after Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation"

"Long-Term Considerations after Chemotherapy & Stem Cell Transplantation" was a presentation given by John McCarty, M.D., an associate professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at VCU Medical Center and medical director of the Bone Marrow Transplantation Program at VCU Massey Cancer Center.

"Late Effects of Radiation Therapy"

"Late Effects of Radiation Therapy" was presentation given by Mitchell Anscher, M.D., chairman of the Department of Radiation Oncology at VCU Massey Cancer Center.

Questions and answers

Full transcript of the question-and-answer session regarding the late effects of cancer therapy